Seminars

Graduate students studying Entomology and Plant Pathology are required to complete seminar hours. Seminars serve as a great way to highlight the research efforts put forth by our students,  faculty and guest lecturers in their areas of study. 

To view seminars from previous years, please see our Seminar Archives

2021 Seminars

  • Jan. 19th, 2021: Dr. Piotr Trebicki
    • Climate change and epidemiology of vector transmitted plant viruses; implications for future food security
  • Jan. 26th, 2021: Dr. Nik Grunwald 
    • Novel tools and approaches inform on Phytophthora pathogen emergence
  • Feb. 2nd, 2021: Dr. Inga Zasada
    • Are plant-parasitic nematodes taking a sip out of your glass of wine?
  • Feb. 9th, 2021: Dr. Hannah Burrack
    • Lessons learned after a decade of Drosophila suzukii
  • Feb. 16th, 2021: Dr. Pasquale Saldarelli
    • Olive Quick Decline Syndrome”: Xylella genomics in Europe and olive interactions
  • Mar. 2nd, 2021: Dr. Tobiasz Druciarek
    • A system-based approach to combat rose rosette disease
  • Mar. 9th, 2021: Dr. Anne Nielsen
    • Brown marmorated stink bug
  • Mar. 16th, 2021: Dr. Rick Cartwright
    • Select Experiences from a Life in Agriculture and Its People
  • Mar. 23rd, 2021: Amber Lancaster
    • Inhibiting Fungicides
  • Mar. 30th, 2021: Kathryn Haydon
    • Rice from paddy to pantry to plate: mitigating rice blast disease with saponins of Medicago, improving shelf life with CRISPR, and exploring global cuisine through text analysis
  • Apr. 6th, 2021: Sherif Sharfadine
    • Rice from paddy to pantry to plate: mitigating rice blast disease with saponins of Medicago, improving shelf life with CRISPR, and exploring global cuisine through text analysis
  • Apr. 13th, 2021: Ava Wait
    • Characterization and epidemiology of two novel strawberry rhabdoviruses
  • Apr. 20th, 2021: Hannah Zima
    • Diseases of Cannabis sativa and the epidemiology of Neofusicoccum parvum
  • Apr. 27th, 2021: Kelley Clark
    • From citrus greening to spinach downy mildew: The progress and perils of working with obligate plant pathogens...and postdocing remotely